“Julian Barnes on Books” (Slightly Soiled, 1986)


Notes on this edition: “Julian Barnes on Books.” Slightly Soiled, Issue 3/4, December 1986. Pp. 15-16.

Julian Barnes has written several times on book collecting, but this essay represents one of his earlier approaches to the topic. Inscribed to his bibliographer.

Book and Magazine Collector, No. 98 (May 1992)


Notes on this edition: Hynson, Colin. “Julian Barnes.” Book and Magazine Collector, No. 98, May 1992. Pp. 39-45.

This issue of Book and Magazine Collector features a lengthy overview of Julian Barnes’s publications up to Talking It Over (1991). The piece depicts the beginning of an overall increase in the collectible value of Julian Barnes books, especially for his highly-praised novel Flaubert’s Parrot.

A Life with Books (Jonathan Cape, 2012)


Notes on this edition: Julian Barnes. A Life with Books. London: Jonathan Cape, 2012. Pp. 27 + [1]. 15 x 11 cm. ISBN: 9780224097260. £1.99.

Published by Jonathan Cape to celebrate Independent Booksellers Week ( 30 June-7 July 2012). It was sold exclusively in independent bookshops. Proceeds from the sale of this pamphlet were donated to Freedom from Torture: The Medical Foundation for the Care of Victims of Torture.

Bound in cream paper wraps with red and black lettering. The author and title of the book are embossed, as pictured. The exact number of copies published is estimated by the author to be around 17,000.

The essay was also published in The Guardian.

Thirty-Seventh Antiquarian Book Fair 1996


Notes on this edition: Julian Barnes. “Introduction.” Thirty-Seventh Antiquarian Book Fair, 1996. London: Antiquarian Booksellers Association, 1996. Pp. 128. 23.5 x 16.9 cm.

In 1996, the Grosvenor House in London hosted the Antiquarian Booksellers Association’s Thirty-Seventh Antiquarian Book Fair, and Julian Barnes wrote the introduction to the fair catalog (pp. 5-7). His essay discusses book collecting and the idealistic notion of “completeness”.

Of the limited number of catalogs published for this occasion, one hundred were signed by Barnes at the end of his introduction. Each signed copy was numbered, as pictured.